Sunday, March 22, 2015

The Magnificent Phallus Indusiatus


This mushroom has many many names to it such as the; veiled lady, long net stinkhorn, crinoline stinkhorn, bamboo pith, bamboo fungus, and was previously identified as the Dictyorphoria Indusitaus. These suckers get there name from the veil hanging from the cap. Hopefully now you recognize one of those names! Alright, this mushroom is mostly found in tropical forests because of the rich soil in these locations. Their life span runs pretty short, they survive for about 12 hours and then end up back into the ground. They originally start off looking like an egg and then emerge, having a veil hang down from the top. This veil is referred to as a indusium. The indusium can grow to the ground or shrink back up to the cap which is interesting when watching in a time lapse. The cap itself can grow about 4cms around and is usually in different colors but mostly a brownish color.

The gross thing about these mushrooms is that they have such a strong smell in which it attracts other gross visitors like flies. Ahhh, how much we love flies. Wanna know something else interesting and gross? Many Asian cuisines and markets like to serve these as a tasty meal. Okay, maybe it's not that disgusting but if this mushroom has a strong foul smell then how can one eat it? Apparently, eating it is not enough because many places use it as a medicine to treat disease of gastric or of any inflammatory problem. This mushroom can also possibly help improve the central nervous system, crazy right? What caught my eye was its appearance, looking at this mushroom makes me think of a bride. I know you see it too! Have any mushroom requests, let me know and I'll do my best to fill you in on the scoop!

2 comments:

  1. I think that your post is very interesting my only question is how fast do they grow and for how long do they live for

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think that your post is very interesting my only question is how fast do they grow and for how long do they live for

    ReplyDelete